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MP40 Inspired Build
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  vintagemx0

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Posted: October 31 2015 at 1:24pm | IP Logged Quote vintagemx0

Well, this project is about done now. I still need to replace those knarley pistol grip wooden pieces with something nicer, but all-in-all it is done.

So, I did have some issues with the rust bluing. I beleive it is because the main tube I used was galvanized and I stripped it with vinegar. I think that some zinc molecules lingered and messed with the formation of the magnatite. I probably should have done some more cycles, but the over-all finish I attained is still better than the over-all quality of my metal work - So, it actually turned-out pretty nice for what it is. (IMO)

I rusted-boiled-and carded 6 times. Here is a typical look at what the rusted parts looked like before each boiling.



I boiled them in one of my wife's roaster pans. I hope the pan is OK as I haven't fully inspected it yet. I may need to buy her a new one...(But more importantly, I don't want her frowning next time I do this...lol)



Here is what the parts typically looked like after boiling. See the silvery look on the tube? That is why I think that zinc was present. Strangely though, after carding the surface was a nice dark gun-metal grey like all of the other parts.



Here is what the parts looked like after carding for the 6th time. It took on this look after about 4 cycles. I have to admit that until after about the 4th cycle, things were not looking very good. However, you just need to have faith that you are building a foundation of oxide with each cycle. You will notice that once the foundation is sufficient, the difference dramatically shows itself after 4 or 5 cycles. Do be sure to use distilled water as it helps optimize results.



So with everything done, this was a good oppritunity to photograph an exploded view showing all parts of this build...



Below is the assembled pistol grip assembly....


And the lower receiver...


The pistol grip installed and the fully assembled lower receiver...


The bolt....


Here is what the unit looks like "field stripped"...


Fully Assembled...


A shot of the business end..



So, this was a fun build. I learned a lot and I have a lot of "If I were to do that again..." experience that will bear fruit on future projects. Thank you everybody I encountered on this forum for being so kind and helpful and making newcomers feel warmly welcomed. I hope to engage in more builds in the very near future, but I will for sure be tuning-in very frequently to monitor the progress of the incredible projects that are going on in here.

-Ken
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  UKBiker

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Posted: October 31 2015 at 3:12pm | IP Logged Quote UKBiker

That's a great finish, and the explanation of how to achieve the end result is fantastic. I had heard of the rust bluing process, but your having laid it out in photos has been spot on.

Once the finish is achieved are there any special requirements to maintain the finish? Do you just care for it in the usual manner? How easy is it to retouch any areas that may experience wear or scratches?

How pungent is the process, does it stink the place up whilst using the rusting solution?

Sorry for all the questions, but I am about to restore a 1940 BSA Cadet .177 air rifle that I was given a couple of years ago by a good friend, his Grandfather bought it new for his Father, he didn't want to take it with him when he moved abroad so he gave it to me knowing I would restore it and keep it, so I'm eager to achieve a good finish now I have sourced the replacement parts. I have tried the cold bluing stuff but I'm not impressed with the durability, but the nice blackened finish would suit it.
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  vintagemx0

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Posted: October 31 2015 at 6:55pm | IP Logged Quote vintagemx0

Thanks UKBiker - I did forget to mention that when you are done with the last carding, you need to apply a liberal coat of your favorite oil (I don't think it really matters which type), massage it in and let sit, then wipe off well and lightly re-oil and wipe again. The initial oiling is important to stop the oxidation reactions going-on and to seal the oxide. After that, it is very low maintenance and does not require any fuss. It is extremely durable, but do protect it from moisture and give it ordinary care that you would to any firearm. It will scratch (not easily) and if this happens, just touch-up with some cold bluing solution. I'd probably apply a dab of boiled linseed oil over the cold blue to help preserve it. (Cold bluing just wears-off so easily and seems solvent when when oils are applied.)

Not pungent at all. I would apply the solution you plan on using in a prepared area in case of spills, but you only want to apply a literal smear that is so light that it appears to dry almost immediately, else you may get heavy corrosion and pitting. The boiling gives off no odor and is a clean process.

That pellet rifle sounds like a very exciting project. I'm very happy for you that you have it. I think this finish would not only give an excellent result, but may very well be period correct. Rust bluing was once a premium standard for firearms finishing that lost it's allure not because of quality, but cost (labor hours). It is one of the best finishes you can ever achieve. It is a very simple process, but I would recommend that you experiment with some small scrap pieces first so you have some experience before trying it out on a true relic like that. I hope you post that project on this site!

-Ken

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  OldCoot

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Posted: November 22 2015 at 3:34pm | IP Logged Quote OldCoot

Rust blue was, historically, the toughest of the blued finishes.
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  vintagemx0

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Posted: November 25 2015 at 8:50pm | IP Logged Quote vintagemx0

It really is tough, and just has a good durable finish you don't have to fuss over. I'll do it again on my next build for sure.

I took this thing out last weekend an fired about 100 rounds through it. It seems to be "breaking in" very well. I experienced no failure to feeds at all. I have a small problem with the ejector hanging up on the firing pin spring. Caused a problem three times during this 100 round session, so I need to sort this out. I really like the feel of the buffer I rigged on this, but I don"t think it is robust for the long-term, so I'll be working on this as well.

-Ken
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  backbencher

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Posted: November 26 2015 at 1:14am | IP Logged Quote backbencher

It's beautiful. We'd love some video.   

Is there an SBR in your future? 41P is coming, latest word is January 2016.   
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  vintagemx0

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Posted: November 26 2015 at 7:43am | IP Logged Quote vintagemx0

Does 41P apply to any and all firearms, or just currently taxed ones?
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  backbencher

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Posted: November 26 2015 at 11:18am | IP Logged Quote backbencher

41P will apply to NFA trusts purchasing new NFA stamps. So if you have an ornery Chief of Police or Sheriff, order your stamps now.
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  Zuzzy

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Posted: December 01 2015 at 5:40am | IP Logged Quote Zuzzy

Should have used muriatic acid for dissolving zinc plating, vinegar is too weak.

Beauty of the build goes without special saying
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  Chuckles

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Posted: January 06 2016 at 10:48am | IP Logged Quote Chuckles

That looks great.



How would this finish work out if a person wanted to be lazy and not remove the old finish from their pps parts kit build?
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